A lot can be learned about the values of capitalist culture by critically investigating the materiality of the machines, processes and practices of technology that consumer society throws away. In its deconstructed form, everyday obsolete domestic technology exposes the confounding ways that humans treat one another and how we engage with our built and natural environments.

Darsha Hewitt’s art practice is situated across new media and sound studies and largely grows out of empirical material based experimentation with obsolete technology. She make electro-mechanical sound installation, performances with hand-made electronics, video, drawing and photography. Her studio practice and teaching methods alike take an adventurous hands-on /media-archeological approach to art making, where hidden systems within technology are de/re-mystified as a means to trace out structures of economy, power and control embedded throughout western culture. Her artwork is presented internationally, with recent exhibitions at the Hong Kong City Hall (CH), Halle14 – Centre for Contemporary Art (DE), MU Artspace (NL), The Museum of Art and Design (NYC), Hartware MedienKunstverein (DE),Gaitée Lyrique (FR), Ottawa Art Gallery (CA), Modern Art Oxford (UK), The CTM Festival Berlin (DE) and WRO Media Art Biennale (PL). She has been awarded numerous commissions, grants and awards for her work. Within Germany, she was the recipient of an International Production Stipend from The Edith-Russ-Haus for Media Art and held a fellowship at the Berlin Centre for Advanced Studies in Arts and Sciences at the University of the Arts in Berlin.

Alongside her art practice, she has worked as an Artistic Associate in Media Art and Design at the Bauhaus University and has been a guest Professor in New Media in the Visual Communications department at Kunsthochschule Kassel and in New Media/Sound at Karlsruhe University of Art and Design. Her contributions to do-it-yourself technology communities are internationally recognized – her workshops and how-to videos have been profiled by technical forums such as the Chaos Computer Congress and Make: Magazine.